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Wednesday, February 10, 2016

Deer Attacks Man in Draper, Utah Backyard

youtube.com
Story thanks to Ben Lockhart and ksl.com. Links provided:
2/8/2016 - DRAPER — A mule deer attacked a Draper man in his backyard Monday, causing "significant wounds," to the man, as well as injuries to the family dog.
The attack, which occurred around 8 a.m. in the SunCrest subdivision in the southeast area of the city, resulted in officers "putting the deer down" after subduing the animal in a struggle, according to a statement issued by the city of Draper.
The injured man's daughter called police to say the deer had hurt the family dog and "was engaged" with her father, city officials said.
"When Animal Services supervisor Dennis Wilson arrived on scene, he found the man lying on the ground with the deer pushing its antlers down into him," the release states. "Officer Wilson grabbed the deer and pulled the antlers away from the man. The man was able to get up and walk back to the house."
Wilson struggled with the deer and gained control, taking the animal to the ground, according to police. Two patrol officers responded to the scene as backup. Police eventually shot and killed the deer, according to city spokeswoman Maridene Alexander.
"If not for the actions of officer Wilson, there could have been far more serious injuries," she said in the statement.
The man's injuries were considered significant, but not life-threatening. His dog suffered a puncture wound.
Draper officials called the ordeal "a very isolated" incident. "It is very rare for a deer to attack a person," the statement said.
Police believe it's likely the deer was trapped in the yard after jumping a fence to get in. The deer was also injured while trying to get out of the yard and may have been startled by the dog, which could have contributed to the animal's behavior.
Draper residents who encounter deer or other wild animals on their property are asked to call the city's animal control officers at 801-840-4***.


Saturday, February 6, 2016

Feds not liable for truck damaged during botched drug sting

fleetowner.com
Article thanks to Larry Kahaner and fleetowner.com. Links provided:

Truck used without owner's knowledge or consent
The Truck Owner's Case Against the Government
Craig Patty's claim seems simple enough. Federal agents used his truck for a government operation without his consent, it was damaged, and Patty wants to be paid for the damages both financial and emotional.
He took his case to the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas, Houston Division where the judge ruled last year that Patty didn't deserve a penny. Although, the judge did not dispute his claim of the facts – all of what Patty alleged about his losses were true – District Judge Lee Rosenthal said that the government was within its rights to deny Patty's claim for restitution because the agents acted within their legal authority to make judgment calls when on the job. One of their calls was to use Patty's  truck without permission.
Patty's co-counsel, Fred Shepherd of the Vickery Law Firm, said of the ruling: "The judge's analysis is that the law enforcement officers under the law are afforded certain flexibility when they have to make judgment calls with regard to undercover operations or police operations. She believed that there was some discretion on the part of the undercover officer who was running the agent. Because she thought that there was discretion involved and his judgment was not to get Patty’s permission to use the truck she thought that exclusionary provision in the law resulted in the government prevailing in the case as a matter of law, not on the facts."
He adds: "This type of ruling, in our judgment, ignores the Constitution, ignores the privacy rights of individuals who are just trying to make a living, an honest living… Even if the district judge was right [applying the law], the law needs to change because this completely tramples what we believe the Constitution protects."
The attorney was also dismayed that the judge sealed many of the documents in the case. "We think that these types of cases should absolutely, positively not be litigated in secrecy, that the public has a right to know what their government is doing. The government is the one that moved to seal all the proceedings, all the hearings, all the filings for the most part."
Patty believes his damages include $133,532.10 in economic compensation to his truck and business as well as $1,483,532.10 million in personal damages. "Remember," said Shepherd, "he had two trucks at the time. He lost half of his business." Adds Patty: "I had worked in the pharmaceutical business for 16 years and had a 401-K that I was now having to pull out to make ends meet because my two-truck business was now a one-truck business."
Patty has feared for his life since the sting. "Helicopters from the local TV station flew over the scene and showed the license plate of my truck. That comes back to my address for all of the internet to see." He is concerned that members of the drug cartel that smuggled the contraband across the border might think he's part of the government operation and retaliate.
"Patty has suffered, and the medical records support this," Shepherd says. "He started having heart palpitations, anxiety attacks. He was terrified for his family and so he did have personal injury damages associated with being worried as hell that these guys were going to come after him. They killed his driver… It’s logical to think that he, his kids or wife may be next and. He'll tell you about how they lined up all their guns in their living room, because they were scared that they would have to defend themselves."
On February 1, Patty's case goes to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans. Patty's lead attorney Andy Vickery will have 15 minutes to present his case and another five minutes for rebuttal.
If Patty loses his case in the Appeal court, the only possible legal step is the Supreme Court. Would they take it to the nation's high court? "We haven’t made any decision on that and some of it would be based on what the Fifth Circuit says and what it holds," says Shepherd.

The Set Up

Steven Craig Patty formed his small trucking company "Craig Thomas Expeditors" in July, 2011. He purchased two Kenworth T600 trucks and contracted two drivers. One of them was Lawrence Chapa. Patty didn't know that Chapa had a criminal record including resisting arrest, possession of cocaine and assault. According to Houston police, the 53-year old Chapa had a hot temper; he had been arrested for grabbing a tire from a Goodyear store's lobby display and throwing it at a mechanic because he believed they were overcharging him. He also had a history of drug use. According to journalist Leif Reigstad, who wrote about the sting operation and resulting trials for the Houston PostChapa's nickname was "Senor Smoke."
None of this showed up in searches when Patty performed his due diligence before hiring Chapa as a contract driver. And it wouldn't. His CDL record would be clean if Chapa was a confidential informant for the DEA. "He had driven for me for five weeks," says the Houston-based Patty. "I had no idea about his background."
The DEA will not confirm whether or not Chapa was one of their confidential informants, but court documents verify that this was the case.
Chapa was driving back from California and called Patty from New Mexico. He was having problems with his truck. He said that a buddy of his in Houston had the needed part and he would drive there and get the repairs taken care of during the upcoming Thanksgiving holiday. Patty okayed the idea. "Chapa told me: 'If you’ll just let me take this truck to Houston, I can have it repaired during the holiday and we won’t accrue any downtime. I’ll bring it back Friday after the holiday.' And I said, 'Well, okay, that sounds like a good plan.' And so I agreed to that. Well that’s not what he did."
Instead, days later Patty received a phone call from a colleague who told him that his driver was shot dead while carrying a load of marijuana. Patty was shocked. As far as he knew, the truck was being repaired in a Houston shop.
Then the calls from law enforcement came. Investigators asked if he knew anything about his truck hauling illegal drugs. Then the lies followed, Patty said. "They said, 'the truck was taken into Mexico, and it was loaded there. Then they crossed back over the Rio Grande.' And I just let them keep talking for a while. I said: ' Look, buddy, I got a tracker in that truck. I know the longitude, latitude, I know what gear it was in and when it started and stopped. I know everything about it. And I said, 'That truck never went to Mexico.' It got real quiet on the phone; it pissed him off. Then they started interrogating me like I was a part it when they knew full well it was their own operation."

A Simple Plan

Court records state that on November 21, 2011, DEA Task Force Officer Fernando Villasana, a Houston Police officer who was federally deputized called DEA agent Keith Jones to tell him that he was organizing a sting involving a confidential informant driver (Chapa) who was asked by someone in the Zeta drug cartel in Mexico to transport 1,800 pounds of marijuana from Rio Grande City, Texas to Houston. Villasana said that the driver had made up a story about having to get repairs done on the truck and that the owner knew nothing about the drug cargo.
The DEA devised a plan to keep the truck under surveillance by undercover vehicles and aircraft until the narcotics delivery took place. At that point, law enforcement would converge and arrest the buyers who they suspected were associated with the Zeta drug cartel. [It is still not confirmed if they were associated with the cartel or not.]
Chapa stayed at a Holiday Inn near the Mexican border where he left the keys in the cab so someone could drive it elsewhere to be loaded during the night. The next day, Chapa drove the truck north to Houston loaded not with 1,800 pounds of pot but less than 300 pounds. He was told by his contact that only part of the shipment made it through the border, but that he should make the run anyway and take the truck to the designated off-loading location. Chapa told his law enforcement handlers about the change, and they decided to continue with the sting operation anyway despite the load being much less than they had expected.
They also had arranged for Chapa's truck to pass through the Falfurrias, Texas  checkpoint without hindrance.

"A Quarter Mile Stretch Of Mayhem"

Chapa was having trouble finding the drop-off point because he was receiving changing directions from a man named Martin Hernandez who Chapa believed was working for a man only known as 'Mauro,' who put the deal together. Chapa may have gotten lost and was having a difficult time staying on the road talking to Hernandez while also trying to keep his handlers informed of his location. Villasana's team had trouble keeping up with Chapa, too, as his truck had to change lanes quickly at one point so he could take an exit toward Hollister Street in northwest Houston.
When Chapa's truck arrived at the designated location, he waited, knowing that he was being watched and protected by undercover officers in vehicles and hiding behind bushes and fences. He didn't know that he was also being observed by heavily- armed men arriving in three SUVs who were planning to rip him off.
According to trial records, one of the men, Fernando Tavera, jumped on the cab's step and held a gun to Chapa. He tells Chapa that he and his crew just want the cargo and that they won't hurt him if he complies. Chapa pleads for his life and, terrified, snugs into the sleeper berth to hide. While two more men reach the cab, Tavera's gun goes off accidentally. Nobody is hit as the bullet plunges into the roof of the cab.
Police hear the shot and swarm for the truck. What happens next is unclear as accounts vary. Crew member Ricardo Ramirez is now driving the truck hoping to escape but the road is a dead end and the truck is too large for a U-Turn. Tavera, trying to flee the frenzy runs and is hit by one of the DEA agent's car. He bounces off and is run over by another agent's vehicle. He is taken alive and handcuffed on the ground. Meanwhile, Ramirez jumps out and the truck is rolling slowly with no one in control. It stops when it hits a concrete wall.
Patty later learns: "Down the road a little way a school bus is coming around the corner and a Harris County Sheriff slammed into that school bus. It was [empty of children],  thank God. But you have about a quarter mile stretch of mayhem. It's a Wild West shootout, and my driver is dead in the back of my truck." Chapa was shot ten times.
During the confusion, a Harris Country Sheriff's deputy was shot in the leg by a member of the DEA task force. The injury was not life threatening.
One remaining question is how did the robbers know about the drug shipment?  
During the series of trials, it came to light that the robbers allegedly belonged to a group known as the "DeLuna crew" headed by Eric DeLuna. It is alleged that Hernandez told him about the cargo and DeLuna put together a group to rip off the truck.
Tavera, the man who threatened Chapa and was hit by multiple police vehicles, received a 35-year sentence for attempted armed robbery; Ricardo Ramirez, who shot at Chapa pled guilty to murder and received a 30-year sentence; Alfred Gomez, who also was charged with Chapa's murder, was found not guilty. The ringleader, Eric DeLuna, pled guilty to attempted robbery and was sentenced to 30 years. The case against Hernandez was dismissed for lack of evidence. Mauro, the alleged drug broker, is at large.

The Truck Owner's Case Against the Government

Craig Patty's claim seems simple enough. Federal agents used his truck for a government operation without his consent, it was damaged, and Patty wants to be paid for the damages both financial and emotional.
He took his case to the U.S. District Court for the Southern District of Texas, Houston Division where the judge ruled last year that Patty didn't deserve a penny. Although, the judge did not dispute his claim of the facts – all of what Patty alleged about his losses were true – District Judge Lee Rosenthal said that the government was within its rights to deny Patty's claim for restitution because the agents acted within their legal authority to make judgment calls when on the job. One of their calls was to use Patty's  truck without permission.
Patty's co-counsel, Fred Shepherd of the Vickery Law Firm, said of the ruling: "The judge's analysis is that the law enforcement officers under the law are afforded certain flexibility when they have to make judgment calls with regard to undercover operations or police operations. She believed that there was some discretion on the part of the undercover officer who was running the agent. Because she thought that there was discretion involved and his judgment was not to get Patty’s permission to use the truck she thought that exclusionary provision in the law resulted in the government prevailing in the case as a matter of law, not on the facts."
He adds: "This type of ruling, in our judgment, ignores the Constitution, ignores the privacy rights of individuals who are just trying to make a living, an honest living… Even if the district judge was right [applying the law], the law needs to change because this completely tramples what we believe the Constitution protects."
The attorney was also dismayed that the judge sealed many of the documents in the case. "We think that these types of cases should absolutely, positively not be litigated in secrecy, that the public has a right to know what their government is doing. The government is the one that moved to seal all the proceedings, all the hearings, all the filings for the most part."
Patty believes his damages include $133,532.10 in economic compensation to his truck and business as well as $1,483,532.10 million in personal damages. "Remember," said Shepherd, "he had two trucks at the time. He lost half of his business." Adds Patty: "I had worked in the pharmaceutical business for 16 years and had a 401-K that I was now having to pull out to make ends meet because my two-truck business was now a one-truck business."
Patty has feared for his life since the sting. "Helicopters from the local TV station flew over the scene and showed the license plate of my truck. That comes back to my address for all of the internet to see." He is concerned that members of the drug cartel that smuggled the contraband across the border might think he's part of the government operation and retaliate.
"Patty has suffered, and the medical records support this," Shepherd says. "He started having heart palpitations, anxiety attacks. He was terrified for his family and so he did have personal injury damages associated with being worried as hell that these guys were going to come after him. They killed his driver… It’s logical to think that he, his kids or wife may be next and. He'll tell you about how they lined up all their guns in their living room, because they were scared that they would have to defend themselves."
On February 1, Patty's case goes to the Fifth Circuit Court of Appeals in New Orleans. Patty's lead attorney Andy Vickery will have 15 minutes to present his case and another five minutes for rebuttal.
If Patty loses his case in the Appeal court, the only possible legal step is the Supreme Court. Would they take it to the nation's high court? "We haven’t made any decision on that and some of it would be based on what the Fifth Circuit says and what it holds," says Shepherd.
http://fleetowner.com/driver-management-resource-center/feds-not-liable-truck-damaged-during-botched-drug-sting?page=5

Wednesday, February 3, 2016

The Worst Cities for Truck Drivers

roadprobrands.com
Article thanks to The RoadPro Family of Brands and Jim Sweeney. Links provided:
Ever notice how ads meant to recruit truck drivers always show semis rolling down scenic highways with no other vehicles in sight?
You’ll never see an ad featuring a truck fighting to change lanes on the Beltway in Washington D.C. or idling on I-285 outside of Atlanta. But the reality is traffic-choked cities are unavoidable for most truckers, whether over-the-road or local.    
While every city of any size has traffic jams, some towns are notorious for having the worst congestion and conditions.    
Navigation equipment manufacturer TomTom has released its annual list of cities with the worst traffic:
  1. Los Angeles
  2. San Francisco
  3. Honolulu
  4. New York City
  5. Seattle
  6. San Jose, Calif.
  7. Miami
  8. Chicago
  9. Washington D.C.
  10. Portland, Ore.
INRIX, which makes transportation software, has its own list with most of the same cities, but it also adds Austin and Bridgeport, Conn.  
In some cases, bad traffic is so widespread than it makes an entire region a nightmare. Southern California, the New York-Boston Corridor, Washington D.C./Baltimore, Chicagoland and Seattle-Tacoma are examples.    
Of course, traffic congestion is only one factor for truckers. They also worry about enforcement, load limits, road conditions, construction and space for easy parking and delivery.
The downtowns of many older cities, especially New York, Boston and others in the Northeast, were built when deliveries were made by horse and wagon, not truck. As a result, the streets are narrow and can have restrictive weight limits. Loading docks are small and there is little room to turn around.
Low bridges and trestles can also close off roads. Drivers single out Pittsburgh as being especially bad for minimum clearance.  The downtowns of older cities also are less likely to have safe places to park overnight, with the closest truck stops located on the outskirts of town.
Truckers also dislike cities with aggressive motorists, ones who like to play bumper cars with trucks. New York City, Los Angeles, Boston and Atlanta are notorious for such encounters.  
When possible, drivers try to avoid the worst cities by going around them or driving through during low-traffic times, such as overnight and between rush hours.
“My plan, as always, is that if I have to drive through places like Chicago, L.A., Atlanta via I-285, I choose 2 to 3 a.m. because it's obvious,” one trucker wrote in response to our question. “Why tackle all that traffic, especially when you are on the clock? But I absolutely refuse to drive through NYC when I'm heading into the Northeast. Even the locals don't drive through it. The George Washington Bridge is a joke even at 1 a.m. I go around, it's not all that farther anyway.”
As for the best cities in which to drive, well, there seem to be only bad and worse, as far as truckers are concerned (though one driver praised Phoenix’s wide streets). Truckers long for those lonely interstates found in the ads.
As one driver put it, “I don’t really have any favorite cities to travel through. I do have some notable back routes that I like to take to avoid congested areas. Some are very scenic and make the route that much more enjoyable.”

How to stay calm in traffic
Truckers who can’t figure out how to keep their cool in traffic don’t last long in the job — it’s a must-have survival mechanism. Still, it never hurts to learn a few tricks to stay calm. Here are five of our favorites:

  • Listen to music that will chill you out. Bumper-to-bumper on I-75 in Dallas is not the place to pop in Metallica’s Kill ‘Em All CD. Maybe some smooth jazz or a Grateful Dead bootleg instead. Sing along.
  • Realize it’s not personal. That four-wheeler who just cut you off doesn’t have it in for you; she’s just a bad driver.
  • Get Zen. Over the course of a day driving, you will be in proximity to hundreds, maybe thousands, of other vehicles. You can’t control what those drivers do. All you can do is drive as professionally as you know how and not let other drivers affect you.
  • Listen to a good book. Literature can take you places far, far away from the construction zone in which you’re stuck. Find some good books and you’ll see traffic jams as opportunities to listen to another chapter.
  • Keep a picture of something beautiful in the cab. A beach, snowcapped mountains, your family – whatever works. Look at the picture. Breathe deeply and relax.



Saturday, January 30, 2016

5 surprising things you didn't know your tablet could do

Article thanks to Kim Komando and komando.com. Links provided:

DEC, 2015  Here's the scenario: You open that rectangular present sitting under the Christmas tree. One whiff of that new tablet smell and you know it’s going to be great.
You quickly power it up, get it on Wi-Fi, set up Facebook, login to Netflix and play around for a while. Then you set it down to go do other things, and that's about as far as you go with learning what your tablet can do. (Note: Here are 10-must have apps for your new tablet.)
While some people don't really need to know more than this, it really helps when you do. Here are five tricks your tablet can do that will make using it so much better.
1. MAKE TEXT EASIER TO READ
A tablet gives you quite a bit more screen space than a smartphone, but a lot of the text can still be too small for some people. Fortunately, you can bump up the size to something a little easier to see.

iPad

Go to Settings>>General>>Accessibility and turn on "Bold Text" and "Larger Text." You can choose either one or both, depending on your preferences. You will need to restart your phone for Bold Text to take effect.

Android

Go to Settings>>Accessibility. Under "Vision," tap "Font size" and set it to "Large." Some phones include the even bigger "Huge" option if you really want to get crazy.

2. TAKE A SCREENSHOT

Did you get a seriously hard question right in Trivia Crack or spell an amazing word in the Scrabble app and want to share it on Facebook? Maybe your friend posted something unintentionally hilarious on Facebook and you want to snag it before they edit it away. You can take screenshots of your tablet's screen with a simple button press.

iPad

Press and hold the Sleep/Wake button, then press the Home button to take a screenshot or two. You should hear a shutter click every time. The screenshots will appear in your Camera Roll or Saved Photos section.

Android

Press the Power button and Volume Down button at the same time. You should hear a shutter click and/or see a white border flash around the edges of the screen. The image is saved to the Captured Images folder in your Gallery app.

3. USE A REAL KEYBOARD

Touch screens are nice for zipping around Facebook, play games or scrolling websites, but they're lousy for typing anything more than a quick Facebook status update. Fortunately, tablets let you hook up a real physical keyboard.
You can find a variety of Bluetooth keyboards on the market that connect wirelessly to most tablets. Some of these are full-size computer keyboards and others are built into tablet cases for easier travel. Either way, they'll help you write longer emails, journal entries or even that novel with much less frustration.
This is just one of the reasons you can replace your computer with a tablet. Learn more about why you might want to buy a tablet for your next "computer."

4. READ TEXT OUT LOUD

While you can always make the text on the screen bigger (see point 1 above), sometimes it would be nice to not look at the screen so much. Both iPad and Android can read what's on the screen and even give additional information you wouldn't immediately notice otherwise.

iPad

Go to Settings>>General>>Accessibility and turn on "VoiceOver." You have the option to practice with VoiceOver, set the speaking rate and other tweaks to make it easier to understand. And you will need to do some playing around to get used to it.
For example you can touch and drag your fingers around the home screen to have it read what's there. Note that in VoiceOver mode, you have to double tap to activate an app. A single tap will give you details about the app.
VoiceOver will read directions to you in Maps, have your camera tell you how many people are in your shot, and get spoken photo descriptions. It will also read you the text from Web pages and text messages.

Android

Go to Settings>>Accessibility and tap TalkBack. If you don't see it, you can download it from the Google Play store. Once you turn it on, your phone will read whatever you touch on the screen, along with incoming notifications. Hint: To perform a regular swipe gesture, you have to use two fingers instead of one.
To adjust your TalkBack settings, go to Settings>>Accessibility and tap "Text-to-Speech" options. You can adjust the voice engine and speed it speaks. To turn TalkBack off without going in to the settings, you just need to press and hold the power button until your Android vibrates.
You can also go into Settings and turn on "Hands-free mode." This will tell you who is calling or messaging.
You can also have TalkBack read eBooks to you if you bought them through the Google Play store. Open the Google Play Store application. You can find this on your main list of applications. Once you do, go to Books>>Book settings (three horizontal lines icon)>>My Books>>My Books settings (three vertical dots icon)>>Enable Automatic read aloud. Then load up an eBook and go.

5. TURN OFF MUSIC AUTOMATICALLY

If you like to listen to music to fall asleep, you might find that a tablet makes a great music player, as long as you have it hooked up to an external speaker like the Komando Connect Bluetooth Speaker. However, once you fall asleep you don't want it to keep running all night, especially if it isn't plugged in.

iPad

Go to the Clock app and tap on "Timer," then "When Timer Ends." From here, scroll all the way down to the bottom of the screen and select "Stop Playing." Then just set how long you want the Timer to run.

Android

Depending on the music player you're using, you may or may not see this option. Samsung's default music player, for example has it under Settings as "Music auto off." However, Google's Play Music app doesn't have an auto-off options.
However, you can get a third-party app like Sleep Timer that works on a timer, or Music Off that has a timer or detects your body movements to know when you go to sleep. Warning: If you're setting your gadget on your bed, make sure it doesn't get covered or it can overheat and become a fire hazard.

BONUS: USE GOOGLE MAPS OFFLINE

Google Maps is great tools for navigating on a smartphone, but they don't work on the go when you're using a Wi-Fi-only tablet. Fortunately, you can download offline maps of an area while at home so you can navigate later even without a signal. Just note that Google will delete the maps after 30 days to save space on your gadget.
In Google Maps for Android, put in a location then tap on the icon with the three horizontal lines to bring up the sidebar menu. Tap "Offline areas" and then the plus sign in the lower-right corner. Choose what area you want then tap the "Download" button. Give it a name and tap Save. You can now find it in the side bar menu when you need it.
Google Maps on iOS used to have this ability, but the latest update doesn't. It might be coming back in a future update, in which case the process will be similar.


Wednesday, January 27, 2016

Trucking company suspends driver who bragged on Facebook

sickfacebook.com
A prime example of "stupid"! Article thanks to ABCactionnews.com and Ryan Raiche. Links provided:

Trucking company suspends driver who bragged on FB that he drove 20+ hours with no sleep.
Nov, 2015  LAKELAND, Fla. - The Florida Highway Patrol is now looking into a truck driver's posts on Facebook, bragging that he drove more than 20-hours straight without sleeping in order to get a good pay day.
The driver, Kerry Cuthbert of Chicago, was making a run from Wisconsin to Lakeland. At the start of his trip, he posted on Facebook, "Forget sleeping, money talks."
Federal regulations limit truck drivers to 11 hours of driving per day before resting for ten hours.
"Either they're lying or they're really breaking the law," said Oscar Nunez, Instructor at NBI Truck Driver Training in Winter Haven.
The first questionable post on Sunday said "… need to be in Lakeland by 6am Tuesday. Forget sleeping, $$$ talk."
In another post -- and between videos taken while driving -- Cuthbert brags to his friends about driving 1,100 miles in 20 hours.
It appears he took a four hour nap near the Florida-Georgia line, according to another post.
"I don't care if you don't have your eleven hours, if you're fatigued, take a break. Do not get behind the wheel until you feel safe," Nunez said.
He said, these days, it's much harder for rogue drivers to skirt the rules because many companies now use electronic records that track your every move.
Truck driver fatigue became a national conversation just last year after the tragic accident that injured comedian Tracy Morgan and killed his friend, James McNair.
It is believed a tired truck driver caused the crash.
In this case, Cuthbert works for the Chicago-based trucking company International Logistics Group.
His manager, Mike Thomas, told me they use electronic records and -- with me on the phone -- traced his driver's real time location to a truck stop in Georgia.
But a post on Facebook said Cuthbert just checked into the Saddle Creek Logistic Services in Lakeland, Florida.
Thomas had no clue he was actually in Lakeland and later described the Facebook posts as just "jokes with his friends."
The Facebook page has since been disabled.
UPDATE 2:
The owner of International Logistics Group told ABC Action News that Cuthbert has been suspended while they investigate his driving. They maintain he did not break the law and say they are proud of their clean safety record.
UPDATE:

The president of transportation at Saddle Creek Logistics in Lakeland tells ABC Action News that their security personnel positively confirmed through video surveillance that truck driver Kerry Cuthbert checked into their facility at 9:14 a.m. Tuesday and left the guard shack at 11:50 a.m.

According to the company Cuthbert drives for, International Logistics Group in Chicago, he was supposed to be in Valdosta, Georgia at the time.